The Future of Performance Footwear

August 1, 2014

Technology continues to have a major influence in the advancement of sport, enabling higher and higher levels of performance to be attained.  Previously unimaginable limits have been reached by matching new technology to optimized personal development regimes.  Most would appreciate the impact made by the use of modern fiber and composite materials used in the manufacture of a multitude of sports products such as tennis rackets, vaulting poles, cycles and footwear to name but a few. Whilst in the past a new piece of equipment has helped athletes, professional or amateur, to achieve a better result; the next generation products will exploit the science of biomechanics to create a new range of more personal technologies that will improve training, drive performance and aid recuperation. Next generation clothing and a range of gadgets, tailored to the individual, could soon be available to hone performance.

Dassault Systèmes and the BBC have come together to investigate how the very latest developments in technology can help athletes in their drive towards optimized performance and to be the best that they can be.  Follow the links below to learn more.

Over the last few decades,technological advancements in sport have been moving the benchmark of human limitations. Some ways are easy to understand: fiberglass poles became more flexible allowing vaulters to reach new heights; replacing wooden tennis rackets with ones made of fiberglass and graphite improved accuracy; swimming bodysuits were developed to reduce drag. 

But while these advances may have been game changing at the time, a new era of technology has arrived that seeks to lift the lid off the secrets to our biomechanics and help push both professional and amateur athletes to greater heights.

In every sport, and at every level, companies are now supplying equipment, clothing and gadgets in a bid to revolutionize the way professionals and amateurs train, compete and recuperate.

Dassault Systemes teamed with the BBC to develop a series of materials to explore how technology is helping both professional and everyday athletes race towards perfection.